Worship

A description of the forms of worship services offered in our churches. 

Worship

In our congregations, we have two primary forms of worship. Though the exact form of each of them has changed over the years, they both go back to the earliest days of the Christian Church. 

Morning Prayer 

A service that starts with praise to God, continues with hearing Scripture, and concludes with praying for our own needs and the needs of the world. The Scripture readings are interwoven with sung "canticles," which are hymns of praise from the Bible set to music. In the Anglican tradition, Morning Prayer (and a similar service in the Evening) is the backbone of daily worship. On Sundays, it is enhanced with a sermon and additional hymns. 

Holy Communion

A service of Word and Sacrament. In the first part, we hear Scripture and a sermon (which is a response to the Scripture), pray to God, and remember our common bonds with our neighbours as we share the Peace of God with one another. In the second part, we remember Jesus' sacrifice for us and his continued presence with us, as we receive his grace and strength in the bread and wine of Holy Communion. Another name for the service is "Eucharist," which comes from a Greek word meaning "thanksgiving." 

On Sundays, each of our four churches offers one or the other of these services. Check the individual church pages for a more precise schedule. 

Readings for This Week & Next

The readings for the 17th Sunday after Trinity, 13 October, are as follows (to read them, go HERE):

  • Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7

  • Psalm 66:1-11

  • 2 Timothy 2:8-15

  • Luke 17:11-19

The readings for the 18th Sunday after Trinity, 20 October, are as follows (to read them, go HERE):

  • Jeremiah 31:27-34

  • Psalm 119:97-104

  • 2 Timothy 3:14 – 4:5

  • Luke 18:1-8

Parentheses mean that the verses are optional, but we usually read the optional verses anyway.

Hymns for This Week

The hymns for Sunday, 13 October, will be announced soon.

These are the hymns for the churches celebrating Holy Communion. Churches having Morning Prayer will likely have only three of these hymns, but will add spoken or sung canticles (songs of praise).